The Political Social Worker
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14 Must Read Social Work Blogs

14 Must Read Social Work Blogs

By Rachel L. West
Advocacy Consultant

Rasmussen College has published an article, 14 Social Work Blogs You Need to Read in 2014. The Political Social Worker made the list along with Social Work Helper. Classroom to Capital, and Notes from an Aspiring Humanitarian.

You can read the entire list here.

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By Rachel L. West
Advocacy Consultant

The Political Social Worker has been named as one of the 14 social work blogs you should be reading in 2014.

7. The Political Social Worker

Why follow?Based on the name of this blog, it’s not really a secret that it’s going to dabble in politics. But author Rachel L. West strikes an admirable and eloquent balance between the world of politics and social work.

The posts on this blog range from a live report on the State of the Union address to an instructional post on calling your congressman about a particular piece of legislation. They also feature tips for students concerning establishing an effective social media presence and creating successful business cards.

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Affirmative Action Today – Should We Still Be Talking About It?

Affirmative Action Today – Should We Still Be Talking About It?

By Chelsea Keeler
MSW Candidate

Say affirmative action – two of the hottest buzz words in past decades – and watch the negative response. But what do we know about it in today’s context? I remember sitting with my guidance counselor senior year at my privileged, primarily white high school and complaining about my chances at top-tier colleges. No school would choose another smart white girl…

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acosa:

This is a free event that is being presented by the Queensboro Council for Social Welfare. You must register by April 22nd. To RSVP email QCSW@aol.com.

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Ask Nicole: “Why Do You Only Care About Women and Girls of Color?”

nicole-clark:

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I recently received the following question from a woman who is interested in starting her own nonprofit:

Hello, Nicole.  I am very impressed with your blog and I enjoy reading it for more ways to get inspiration. 

I’m interested in creating a nonprofit organization for teen girls, focusing on empowerment, education, and sports. I am Latina, and while I enjoy working with young Latinas, I’m wondering if I should focus my business around working with all teen girls, regardless of race or ethnicity. I see that your business focuses exclusively on women and young women of color. Do you ever get asked, “Why do you only care about women and girls of color?” Do you ever feel that you may be limiting yourself? I feel that if I create a business that focuses on all teen girls I will look more attractive to potential clients and will be able to grow my business more quickly, but if I focus on Latina teens, I would feel that I have more of an investment beyond getting paid for my services. I believe deep down that I know what I should do, but I don’t want to limit myself. And I’m afraid of overextending myself. 

Thank you again for your inspiration! I look forward to your reply. 

This is a really great question, and I’m happy to answer it!

I’ve been asked “Why do you only care about women and girls of color?” in a variety of ways for a long time. I think the first time I was asked was years ago, long before I could even envision what my business would look like today. But instead of being asked by a woman, I was being asked by men, who wanted to know what makes women and girls of color more important than working with entire communities of color. I was given advice on how I can include more men and young boys of color into what I wanted to do, how young men and boys of color “have it worse” compared to young women and girls of color, and how communities of color needed someone like me to provide inspiration to all young people, not just young girls of color. I’ve also be questioned on why I, as a Black woman, focus on all women and girls of color and not just Black women and girls. 

(It’s always interesting how people who have the most ideas on what you need to do, never seem to have the time or interest in making these improvements themselves. But that’s another matter!)

I’ll answer this question in three parts: 1) Why I’m invested in all women and girls of color, 2) the benefits of creating a niche and 3) the fear of limiting yourself:

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